Monday, April 16, 2018

Stars Over Captain Cook

Our last full night on the big island had very clear skies.  The stars really came out because there was not much light pollution to obscure them.  I took these shots in the backyard of the VRBO where we stayed and they are really my first attempt at “shooting” stars at night.  The one with the coconut trees in it shows what light painting with a dim LED flashlight can do.  I shined the flashlight on the trees and the house while taking the shot.  I did not do any light painting in the other picture with just the house.

I hope you enjoy the photos and thanks for dropping by!


Captain Cook Stars 02


Stars Over Captain Cook 01
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Saturday, March 24, 2018

Rocks and Waves 02

This is another shot taken as the sun was going down at Kamaole Beach Park II in Kihei, Maui, Hawaii.

I hope you enjoy the photo and thanks for dropping by!

Rocks and Waves 02
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Friday, March 2, 2018

Pacific Green Sea Turtle

We were doing a little shopping in Paia on Maui when we got a hot tip from someone that there were sea turtles at Ho'okipa Beach just two miles away.  We had to check it out!  Sure enough, two of them were crawling up.  A crowd of people gathered and took their own pictures and when it got too crowded, we left.

There are sorts of rules for keeping your distance from these guys, but there were no signs at this beach regarding said rules like at other beaches in HI.

To get this shot, I just crouched down through the gathering throng and zoomed in.  I didn't want to get super close, so the tele-lens helped.

One lady that was there said that just a couple days prior there were so many on the beach that you couldn't tell the rocks from the turtles!

A photographer that took our anniversary pictures said that the reason the turtles come up on the beach is to warm up from being in the water at up to three weeks at a time, and to lay eggs of course.

Apparently they are called "green sea turtles" due to the color of the fat content underneath the shell.

I hope you enjoy the photo and thanks for dropping by. 

Greene Sea Turtle
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Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Haleakala Shadow

The first morning after we arrived in Maui, Eileen and I got into the Jeep Wrangler and drove up to the top of Haleakala mountain.  From there we were supposed to see a great sunrise.  We got up around 2:30am to beat traffic and got there around 4am.  The sun wasn't due to be up for two hours.  I hoped that there would be some great nighttime starlight shots to get, but those hopes got dashed.  It was actually very cloudy at the top, the wind was blowing about 40mph and it was about 35 degrees F.  It was cold!  So, we just stayed in the Jeep and slept until just before sunrise.  However, the sun never broke through the clouds.  We ended up driving down the mountain until we got thru the cloud deck and pulled over to a scenic outlook.  That's where I got this shot.

You can see the shadow of Haleakala cast over the rest of the island!  Also, it was during a blue moon and you can see the moon adds a nice little accent to the image!  It was a great view, but still wish we could have seen the sun from the very top!

Kihei - the city we stayed in - is along the coastline in the lower left portion of the shot.

I hope you enjoy the photo and thanks for dropping by. 

More about Haleakala from Wikipedia
Haleakalā (/ˌhɑːlˌɑːkəˈlɑː/; Hawaiian: [ˈhɐlɛˈjɐkəˈlaː]), or the East Maui Volcano, is a massive shield volcano that forms more than 75% of the Hawaiian Island of Maui. The western 25% of the island is formed by another volcano, Mauna Kahalawai, also referred to as the West Maui Mountains.
The tallest peak of Haleakalā ("house of the sun"), at 10,023 feet (3,055 m), is Puʻu ʻUlaʻula (Red Hill). From the summit one looks down into a massive depression some 11.25 km (7 mi) across, 3.2 km (2 mi) wide, and nearly 800 m (2,600 ft) deep. The surrounding walls are steep and the interior mostly barren-looking with a scattering of volcanic cones.

Haleakala Shadow
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Disqus for Evan's Expo